Tag Archives: culture

Agustin Surai – Inventories

If you’re a designer like me (which I’m assuming most of you are), then you are well versed in all things Adobe Illustrator, and if you use AI like I do, then after a vigorous designing session your artboard surrounded your creation tends to look like a whirlwind of colorful ephemera and bits and pieces of discarded materials. That’s exactly what I though of when I first saw Agustin Surai’s Inventories series of illustrations. These pieces are like snapshots of a debris field in a hurricane – tree limbs, animals, electronics, clothing…all flying around independent of each other. Other pieces in the series seem to tell a story or collect a narrative of sorts using only the handful of objects on the canvas.

See more artwork by Agustin Surai here.

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Scott London – Burning Man 2011

Take a look at this great set (100 in all) that photographer Scott London took during this year’s mother of all freak-fests, Burning Man. I’ve never been myself and honestly, I still haven’t worked up the courage to spend that much time out there in the desert without all the modern amenities I’ve grown accustomed to, but it’s amazing to see such a large group of people creating huge structures, machines and other artwork in the vastness of that terrain.Maybe next year…maybe…

See Scott London’s Burning Man photos here.

Back4theFuture.com

 

This week, “sneaker freakers” and fans of the beloved 80’s Back To The Future film trilogy finally saw the realization of one of the holy grails of movie-fashion concept designs: The Nike Air MAG. A prop designed and used for the second installment of the film, the Air MAGs (or Magnetic Anti-Gravity) were fantastic futuristic sky tops complete with lights and auto-lacing technology. They were of course only an idea in a film about a supposed future, but fans fell in love with them and hoped, prayed and even petitioned to see their fateful production.

This week, Nike, in partnership with Universal Films and the Michael J. Fox Foundation released a limited line of 1500 pairs of the Nike Air MAG to be placed on eBay for charity auction to raise funds for the Fox foundation seeking a cure for Parkinsons disease. All of this is wonderfully explained on Nike’s new microsite Back4theFuture.com, a cleverly devised website to promote not only the legend and spirit of the films and the storied shoe, but also aiming to shed light on the affliction of Parkinsons in a witty and encouraging way. The site, which I believe was designed by Nike’s longtime agency of record Wieden and Kennedy, follows a similar structure to the previous Nike Better World site, leading the visitor downward through a series of automated tiles displaying messaging and finally landing at an interactive display video complete with a cameo from The Doc himself.

The site is clean and brisk, with bold messages set in Nike’s 80’s trademark tightly kerned bold Futura to give a perfect retro-future look and feel. Also, be sure to check out “The Continuum”, a running blog of sorts on the site that collects news, articles, events and social network activity related to the release.

Visit Back4theFuture.com here. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pop Chart Labs – The Evolution of Video Game Controllers Print

Brooklyn’s Pop Chart Lab is back with a brand new print and this time they set their well honed sights on “The Evolution of the Video Game Controller”. Like most of PCL’s designs, they chart and document a varied and crowded topic, in an extremely detailed and organized way. Be sure to also check out their other great prints, especially “A Visual Compendium of Notable Haircuts…” and my personal favorite, “The Splendiferous Array of Culinary Tools.”

Visit the Pop Chart Lab here.

Philip Govedare – Excavation paintings


Landscapes, along with portraits and still lifes are the holy grail of traditional painting. So to see a classic format using the same tools but so obviously created in a more modern fashion seems like a revelation. Mapping man’s persuasion on his terrain, Philip Govedare‘s series entitled Excavation, takes a macro approach to it’s landscapes – giant, sweeping washes of color that appear almost like abstract color studies at first, are in fact attempts to showcase the enormity of our destruction and ability to reform our world to our whims. What I found most impressive is the perspective, as if you are peering down from an airliner in mid-flight, thousands and thousands of feet above the ground, a view earlier landscape artists never had the pleasure of knowing.

See more of Philip Govedare’s artwork here.

David Guttenfelder – Scenes from inside North Korea

David Guttenfelder, chief Asia photographer for the Associated Press, who has been given unprecedented access to the isolated Stalinist state as part of the agency’s efforts to expand its coverage there. The pictures are among the most candid ever published in Western newspapers. “

Striking images of a truly isolated society. The photographs also portray a culture mesmerized with, but unable to duplicate the abundance and aesthetic we take for granted in the Western world. American-style food, water parks, etc., all replicated but through a slightly warped lens.

Read the article and see the slideshow here.

Instagram reaches a milestone

With Instagram just announcing their 150,000,000th photo uploaded and shared, I thought it was a good time to post a couple of my own in loving appreciation for the iPhone app. Instagram is a great way to compose, manipulate and sometimes even promote (General Electric and IBM both have great feeds) photographs that get shared and “liked” by a community of over 7 million and growing. My initial reluctance (I’m a physical Polaroid fan at heart) has gave way to full-on conversion, I have really enjoyed sharing and seeing all the great photos posted from all over the world.

I have a running collection of my Instagrams here. And if you are on Instagram, be sure to say hi, I’m “BryanByczek”.