Tag Archives: technology

Back4theFuture.com

 

This week, “sneaker freakers” and fans of the beloved 80’s Back To The Future film trilogy finally saw the realization of one of the holy grails of movie-fashion concept designs: The Nike Air MAG. A prop designed and used for the second installment of the film, the Air MAGs (or Magnetic Anti-Gravity) were fantastic futuristic sky tops complete with lights and auto-lacing technology. They were of course only an idea in a film about a supposed future, but fans fell in love with them and hoped, prayed and even petitioned to see their fateful production.

This week, Nike, in partnership with Universal Films and the Michael J. Fox Foundation released a limited line of 1500 pairs of the Nike Air MAG to be placed on eBay for charity auction to raise funds for the Fox foundation seeking a cure for Parkinsons disease. All of this is wonderfully explained on Nike’s new microsite Back4theFuture.com, a cleverly devised website to promote not only the legend and spirit of the films and the storied shoe, but also aiming to shed light on the affliction of Parkinsons in a witty and encouraging way. The site, which I believe was designed by Nike’s longtime agency of record Wieden and Kennedy, follows a similar structure to the previous Nike Better World site, leading the visitor downward through a series of automated tiles displaying messaging and finally landing at an interactive display video complete with a cameo from The Doc himself.

The site is clean and brisk, with bold messages set in Nike’s 80’s trademark tightly kerned bold Futura to give a perfect retro-future look and feel. Also, be sure to check out “The Continuum”, a running blog of sorts on the site that collects news, articles, events and social network activity related to the release.

Visit Back4theFuture.com here. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Pop Chart Labs – The Evolution of Video Game Controllers Print

Brooklyn’s Pop Chart Lab is back with a brand new print and this time they set their well honed sights on “The Evolution of the Video Game Controller”. Like most of PCL’s designs, they chart and document a varied and crowded topic, in an extremely detailed and organized way. Be sure to also check out their other great prints, especially “A Visual Compendium of Notable Haircuts…” and my personal favorite, “The Splendiferous Array of Culinary Tools.”

Visit the Pop Chart Lab here.

Philip Govedare – Excavation paintings


Landscapes, along with portraits and still lifes are the holy grail of traditional painting. So to see a classic format using the same tools but so obviously created in a more modern fashion seems like a revelation. Mapping man’s persuasion on his terrain, Philip Govedare‘s series entitled Excavation, takes a macro approach to it’s landscapes – giant, sweeping washes of color that appear almost like abstract color studies at first, are in fact attempts to showcase the enormity of our destruction and ability to reform our world to our whims. What I found most impressive is the perspective, as if you are peering down from an airliner in mid-flight, thousands and thousands of feet above the ground, a view earlier landscape artists never had the pleasure of knowing.

See more of Philip Govedare’s artwork here.

Instagram reaches a milestone

With Instagram just announcing their 150,000,000th photo uploaded and shared, I thought it was a good time to post a couple of my own in loving appreciation for the iPhone app. Instagram is a great way to compose, manipulate and sometimes even promote (General Electric and IBM both have great feeds) photographs that get shared and “liked” by a community of over 7 million and growing. My initial reluctance (I’m a physical Polaroid fan at heart) has gave way to full-on conversion, I have really enjoyed sharing and seeing all the great photos posted from all over the world.

I have a running collection of my Instagrams here. And if you are on Instagram, be sure to say hi, I’m “BryanByczek”.

Outliers Project

Earlier this week, one of my favorite photographers, Kim Holtermand, announced an awesome new project in collaboration with film makers Scenic and fellow visionary Tim Navis. Outliers, Volume 1, aims to create a series of short films in and around the beautiful and mysterious Icelandic countryside. A Kickstarter project has already launched and you can pledge funds now until September, with a whole range of tiers with some great and unique gifts for your support, like limited edition books celebrating the project and one-off prints and stills of their sure-to-be impressive work.

Learn more about the Outliers Project and pledge funds here.

Libratone Lounge Speakers

Between these and the Jawbone Jamboxes, speaker makers are really making a well-designed attempt to cater to the Apple iDevice crowd. Scandinavian audiologists Libratone recently unveiled their Airplay enabled Lounge series of speakers, an all in one elongated case draped in cashmere wool, about the length of a large rolling pin. A modern, beautifully minimal piece for sure, but at about $2K each, I doubt I will come in contact with one anytime soon. Libratone, if you are reading this, I am, however, more than happy to test one out if you would like to send me one (in grey please)!

Read about Libratone’s new Lounge speakers here.

Relaunched: AIGA website

Not exactly “breaking news” but AIGA, the nation’s largest organization devoted to the profession of design, recently relaunched and redesigned their website and it’s a radical departure for a somewhat staid institution. Adopting the ever more popular website style I refer to as “Chinese Buffet”, the AIGA site no longer has a traditional flow or “above the fold” content layout, but a scalable column system of multiple content boxes and “ads” that shift position depending on the size of your browser. It’s a layout and design that could look disastrous, cluttered and unfocused in the wrong hands, but AIGA wisely and subtly creates hierarchy and order amidst the chaos, especially in the nice touches of blog-style tags and categories, and greying out certain columns of information that only become more apparent when scrolled over, leading your wandering eyes in a more curated way.

It’s not a perfect design, but it’s a great evolutionary step for a web presence devoted to the multitudes of graphic arts and creativity. I personally hate when you maximize your browser window to take full advantage of the reshuffling tiles, only to scroll down to find certain columns are exceedingly and inexplicably longer than others. But it’s a minor quibble that could easily be fixed by allowing all the tiles to reshuffle freely.

This buffet style of web design, where you pick and choose what content to access and what to avoid is not for everyone, but for AIGA, an organization devoted to the visual craft of design and it’s myriad forms and developments, it’s a great opportunity to showcase lots of talent, events, and social activity that can keep you educated and entertained long after a more traditional layout would have.

Visit the new AIGA website here.